Education

What edtech should schools keep in today’s new normal?

The COVID-19 pandemic has certainly thrown education for a loop. Even as classes resumed this past fall, many districts implemented widespread student and teacher quarantines and shifted to virtual learning as new outbreaks and variants emerged.

What new tools, techniques, and innovations should stick around in primary schools even after COVID recedes (whenever that may be)?

Check out this eSchool News webinar and learn from veteran educators who recall their work-around strategies during the massive shift to remote learning. They’ll provide valuable insight and will suggest which tools and strategies should be kept to create new hybrid learning models for younger students.

Laura Ascione
Latest posts by Laura Ascione (see all)

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My experience with online education began 19 years ago after I took a break from teaching in
the brick and mortar setting to give birth to my daughter. When I was ready to get back in the
game, several of my colleagues recommended Florida Virtual School (FLVS), which at the time
was in its infancy.

The next few years could be a turning point for those of us involved in early education, and even for education in general.

Classroom technology is essential, and nothing made that more obvious than the COVID-19 pandemic that forced learning to go virtual and hybrid. Technology upgrades help make students feel included and achieve their full potential. But funding for classroom tech tools is always a challenge.

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